Field Test: SEVR Broadheads

SEVR Broadheads have earned a place in my quiver, and if you give them a shot, they will earn a place in yours, too.

Field Test: SEVR Broadheads

Through the years I’ve shot, tested and bowhunted with a lot of broadheads — A LOT! From fixed-blades to mechanicals to hybrid-styles, I’ve run throngs of blades through targets, wood, cinder blocks and, of course, hide, hair and bone. Some were awesome. Some were okay. Some were pure snake oil — driven more by fancy marketing and PR than innovation and technology.

Early in my bowhunting career, I hunted with numerous broadheads from an array of manufacturers. Today, there are only five I will screw on my arrow shafts. Period! Four of them are of the mechanical nature — I’m just a mechanical guy — the other is a tried-and-true fixed-blade.

The fifth head to earn a spot and round out my all-time top five is the new SEVR Broadhead. A rear-deploying mechanical featuring a titanium ferrule with 420-grade surgical stainless blades, this broadhead boasts an ideal strength-to-weight ratio, and the fully-contained blade system creates an aerodynamic profile that promises field point accuracy. I could go on about the head’s many features, but you’re already online, and by simply visiting www.sevrbroadheads.com you can read all about those traits. This, after all, is a field test.

Unboxing and First Impressions

I love the packaging. Each head is individually packaged in a SEVR Titanium branded box, and each box includes an extra pair of O-rings and a set screw. More on the set screw later. Also included is a red broadhead wrench/wedge tool. This is used to snug heads down on the shaft and to safely and easily fold the blades back into the ferrule. Also included is a hex-head wrench, which fits the set screws.

Each mechanical is individually packaged in a SEVR Titanium branded box, which includes an extra pair of O-rings and a set screw.
Each mechanical is individually packaged in a SEVR Titanium branded box, which includes an extra pair of O-rings and a set screw.

The 2.1-inch-cut heads screwed and seated against my Easton 5MM FMJ and Axis 5MM shafts without problem. The broadhead comes hunt-ready out of the box — the O-ring is fitted in the machined slot and lays perfectly in the slight recessed grooves in each blade. A single set screw just below the needle-point tip holds a spacer along with the pair of blades under perfect pressure.

Now for one of my favorite features: The second set screw (mentioned earlier) can simply be inserted in the second hole in the ferrule just below the first set screw. Tighten this screw down and the head can be shot like a field point; it will not deploy. How awesome is that? Getting to practice with the exact head you plan to run through a game animal ... I love it! Oh, and I shot a pair of SEVR heads in practice mode more than 100 times each and the set screw never so much as backed-out a single turn. When you’re ready to convert the head back to hunt mode, simply remove the bottom set screw. Simple. Effective. Purposeful.

On the Range

SEVR’s claim of field point accuracy was spot-on. Out to 80 yards (which was the max test distance), I consistently stacked SEVR heads with my field points. These heads fly fast, clean and quiet.

The author’s arrow group from 80 yards, using two field tips and two SEVR broadheads.
The author’s arrow group from 80 yards, using two field tips and two SEVR broadheads.

I did, for the sake of testing, fire a few heads without the practice set screw. I had zero issues with blade deployment, and the surgical slices in my Block target were more than enough to create an ear-to-ear grin. Plus, using the wedge tool, I could easily pivot one blade back into the ferrule, then insert the wedge tool between the blade and deployment arm and easily return the existing, exposed blade back into the ferrule.

SEVR Broadheads come with a handy wedge tool, which is used to snug heads down on the shaft, as well as safely fold blades back into the ferrule.
SEVR Broadheads come with a handy wedge tool, which is used to snug heads down on the shaft, as well as safely fold blades back into the ferrule.

SEVR Broadheads are designed with a Lock-and-Pivot system, which locks the blades together while allowing them to pivot around bone for the straightest and most efficient cut possible. Needless to say, I was stoked to get these heads into the bowhunting woods.

In the Field

With only an Oklahoma fall turkey tag still in my pocket, I headed to the Sooner State hopeful of a fowl encounter. I’m sure some reading this are rolling their eyes and muttering, “You’re going to test a broadhead on turkey? What good is that going to do?”

Let me stop you right there. Ask just about any veteran bowhunter out there, at least any honest ones, and they’ll tell you that they’ve lost more turkeys with arrows sticking out of them than any other game animal. Yes, turkeys have small kill zone, but they also have a wall of feathers that clog and cover sharp blades. Run once razor-sharp blades now covered in blood-soaked feathers into even hollow bones and penetration is often thwarted.

The group of meandering fall hens were making their way through a small funnel, and I had the high ground. I picked out the biggest mama-bird in the bunch (she sported a small, stubby beard), and sent my FMJ in her direction. The SEVR head entered behind the left wing on the quartering-away bird and broke the opposite-side shoulder bone (slicing it cleanly in half), before hitting a rock and bouncing back into the bird’s middle section. The hen took the hit and stumbled about 5 yards. Oh, and the head, even the tip, was undamaged. And, yes, it was one of the heads I’d been using in practice mode the week prior to the hunt.

The author’s SEVR broadhead did massive damage to a fall turkey; it opened a wide hole and even broke a wing bone.
The author’s SEVR broadhead did massive damage to a fall turkey; it opened a wide hole and even broke a wing bone.

Mission accomplished. This killer head will fill my quiver on many more bowhunts in the future.

For more information, visit www.sevrbroadheads.com.

This Oklahoma turkey fell to the author’s well-placed SEVR Broadhead.
This Oklahoma turkey fell to the author’s well-placed SEVR Broadhead.
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