Wild Eats: Jamaican Style Venison Curry with Acorn Squash

If you enjoy cooking with wild game and like flavor-packed meals, this Jamaican style venison curry with acorn squash hits the mark on both counts.
Wild Eats: Jamaican Style Venison Curry with Acorn Squash

If you enjoy cooking with wild game and like flavor-packed meals, this Jamaican style venison curry with acorn squash hits the mark on both counts.

Trey Reid with the Arkansas Game & Fish Commission is a veteran hunter and whiz in the kitchen. In this video below, he's combining a trio of my favorite things — acorn squash, venison, and a dish with curry. It's easy to make and will give you a new challenge, albeit not a hard one, to try with your venison this season.

Acorn squash is a winter vegetable with dark green skin and a yellow-orange flesh inside. It's part of the same squash group as zucchini and crookneck. I'm not a fan of zucchini so take that mess elsewhere. But the acorn squash is versatile and delicious.

Don't be afraid of curry, either. It's not some kind of wild and crazy international thing that's going to kill you or blow your head off due to spicy heat. It could, if you wanted it to, because you can add peppers to make it as hot as you wish. Or leave them out and create your own curry, as in the video, to make it flavorful but mild with a hint of kick.

One site I enjoy a lot is SeriousEats.com, because they break down food on different levels and have some super recipes. By breaking down, I mean they explain what's going on with a specific thing, such as spices, or why this dish works well with this but not that. I hesitate to use the phrase food scientists but that's kinda sorta what they are and it's cool.

Their recipes sometimes stir me to wonder about switching beef for venison, as in this one for Ropa Vieja, or perhaps savory wild pheasant instead of bland chicken. In this recipe for a Jamaican Curry Chicken, they create their own curry spice mix with cumin seeds, whole mustard seeds, anise, coriander seeds, whole allspice and fenugreek. After toasting, they add turmeric. To see how much of each along with the recipe, give them a visit here.

 



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