Tips for Hanging Treestands on Public Land

Whitetail success on public land often begins with learning how to quickly and quietly hang a portable treestand.

Tips for Hanging Treestands on Public Land

You lost your whitetail lease to somebody with a fatter wallet. We’ve all been there; it happens all the time. Don’t fret. Just change your tactics.

Jump on your computer or smartphone and start searching for public land areas. This great nation is loaded with national forest, BLM, walk-In areas, game production lands and the like. Will you have hunting competition? Possibly. Will you be able to go in to prep treestands and cut shooting lanes? Doubtful. Most public land areas restrict the cutting of natural vegetation. Those that don’t often limit the amount of time a stand can be in a tree. Again, don’t fret.

Swap your 1,500-cubic-inch pack out for a more spacious tote in the 2,000- to 3,000-cubic-inch range. You will need extra space for your gear and additional straps to secure your treestand and climbing sticks to the outside of your pack. You’ll also want a lightweight and adjustable hang-on treestand in the 8- to 14-pound range, as well as climbing sticks. Lone Wolf and Millennium make some great stands and sticks.

Most of the time, when you find that tree located in the perfect spot, it will be small, crooked and not stand-friendly. A treestand with diminutive dimensions, paired with seat and platform adjustability, is paramount.

In the days before your hunt, take time to practice loading and unloading your pack. Develop a system for attaching your treestand and climbing sticks. I love small bungee cords for this. Also, you will want to dedicate a spot inside the pack for all your other necessary gear. Organization is a staple to public land whitetail success.

It's prohibited to use screw-in treesteps on most public lands, so deer hunters must learn how to quietly and safely use strap-on climbing sticks.
It's prohibited to use screw-in treesteps on most public lands, so deer hunters must learn how to quietly and safely use strap-on climbing sticks.

Another great tip, and one that will make you all the stealthier, is to take Gorilla Tape and cover all of the metal contact points on your treestand and climbing sticks. This will eliminate banging and clanging during transport.

Lastly, do a few quick practice hangs in your backyard or on the perimeter of your hunting grounds. Developing a system for getting up a tree quickly, quietly and safely is a must. Get after ‘em.

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