High Volume, Long-Range Remotes: Are They Needed to be a Better Hunter?

It’s no secret that the technology as well as quality of electronic predator calls has seen a steady increase throughout the years. But do we really need high volume and long-range remotes to be better hunters?

High Volume, Long-Range Remotes: Are They Needed to be a Better Hunter?

Being able to turn a caller on and off, as well as control the volume from several hundred yards away, is a true sign that calls are technologically more advanced than ever. (Photo: Heath Wood)

It’s no secret that technology and the quality of electronic predator calls has seen a steady increase throughout the years. These calls feature multiple horn style speakers while a few host single oversized speakers. No matter the design, the market demand for an electronic predator call seems to be for increased volume that carries the sounds a longer distance and an increased range from the remote.

Even with those two features in high demand, I tend to question if high volume and long-range remotes are really needed. In addition, if higher volume calls and long-range remotes are an inevitability, can these technological advances make one a better predator hunter?

A few years ago I was working with multiple companies while at trade shows and doing in-store promotions. I was fortunate enough to visit with several fellow predator hunters. There was a common occurrence when someone was in search of a new electronic call. The customers’ most frequently asked question almost always consisted of how far the range of the remote would work. 

In my own experiences, I have never been of fan of placing my caller a long distance away. My No. 1 reason is it places the hunter at risk of a coyote hanging up past the caller; thus the coyote would not be within a comfortable gun range. If the caller is 100-150 yards away and a coyote hangs up 100 yards from the caller, the coyote is now 200-250 yards away, leaving a longer shot. If the call is about 50 yards and the coyote hangs up, he is still at a better shooting distance — allowing for an easier shot.  

To get a better understanding of what other predator hunters prefer, I decided to question one of the most recognized faces in the world of predator hunting.

Veteran Predator Hunter

Three-time World Coyote Calling champion and FoxPro pro Al Morris has hunted coyotes for several years while traveling across the country. Morris agrees there are times when a long-range remote can be useful. However, most of the time he prefers the caller at a close range while strategically putting it in place. 

“I rarely get over 30-50 yards from my caller, and that is mostly because I am trying to get them in close for videoing as well as within shotgun range,” he said. Besides the distance, another overlooked task is putting it where a coyote is mostly likely to approach from. “I know with my electronic caller I am about 70 percent sure of where that coyote is going to show up and where I want him positioned. I have a so-called ‘A-Zone’ of where I want to harvest a coyote, and I can put them there by where I place my caller."

When placing his caller, Morris considers terrain and wind direction.

“I will typically place my caller around 30 to 50 yards upwind from where I will be sitting," he said. "This is mostly because if a coyote does wind me, he is hopefully within shotgun range before doing so."

Being able to work a caller's volume and sounds from a long distance makes today's technology grand for hunters. But learning how to use these callers effectively involves trial and error. (Photo: Heath Wood)
Being able to work a caller's volume and sounds from a long distance makes today's technology grand for hunters. But learning how to use these callers effectively involves trial and error. (Photo: Heath Wood)

Positioning the caller to help steer a predator also works on fox. While on a recent hunt in Texas, Morris and Tim Wells hunted fox with crossbows. “By positioning the caller at a close range, we were able to bring fox out of the brush into bow range, all because of where we put the caller,” Morris said.

Even though Morris prefers his caller within close range, he agrees there are times when a remote that can work from several yards away has its benefits.

“There are certain situations where I have used my remote a long distance, such as in deep canyons or in draws where I think coyotes are going to come out of a certain wood line, field or group of CRP," he said. "In these situations, by placing the caller 100 to 125 yards from me, if those coyotes end up downwind of the caller, they will be where I can kill them easy." In the last four years while using FoxPro calls such as the Inferno or Banshee, Morris has used the remotes out to 800 yards while placing the caller on a rock on the side of a hill. 

Being able to turn a caller on or off and control the volume from several hundred yards away is a true sign that calls are technologically more advanced than ever. After Morris’s explained scenarios, it was more understandable why a hunter would need to use a caller at a long distance. However, he stressed that he uses this technique only when hunting the canyon-like terrain. When Morris is trying to gain video footage, the caller is usually only 30 to 50 yards away.

Add Decoy Dogs

The technology of today’s electronic callers can, however, be beneficial for use other than predator hunting. Morris also loves hunting coyotes with decoy dogs — especially in summer — and relies on a long distance remote while training his dogs. “When I am training a dog to go to a howl, I like the ability to have the call 400 yards or so away while still being able to shut the call on and off and control the volume,” he said.

Another thing to remember for training or hunting is to have a clear view of the caller. Morris said that areas that have a lot of rocks can be magnetic and may sometimes affect the range of remotes. Some hunters elevate the call by hanging it on a fence post, tree limb or even using a small tripod to help get a better range from caller base to the remote. Morris agrees that getting the caller off the ground helps with remote range, and also improves sound quality and volume. When a caller is placed directly on the ground it can muffle the sound quality.

When a person is in search of a quality electronic caller, yes, it is important to have the ability to get high volume and have a remote that works several yards away. However, don’t let those features ruin a hunt. It is still important not to play sounds at a high volume when it is not needed. Playing sounds too loud in some areas can spook coyotes. As Morris mentioned, only use volume when terrain makes it needed. The same goes for the remote — only use to its maximum range when absolutely needed.

Getting a coyote within close range is one of the biggest thrills anyway. Keep it close and learn to steer coyotes into perfect shooting range. 

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