Whistle blasts, yells, nothing was getting Buddy back to me. It looked like he was actually running away — each command got the opposite reaction from what I wanted.

One more tootle on the whistle and the echo hit me in the face, the problem now quite obvious. Sound waves left my mouth, traveled the hot dry canyon and bounced off the massive basalt walls. That's what Buddy heard. No wonder he streaked away — he was eagerly trying to please me but headed for the nearer source of the command — the rock, not me.

Wow, that sure changed the way I look at (er, hear) dog commands. Further experimentation showed that knolls, thick forest, even water will all affect what your dog hears, and where he thinks that sound is coming from. It's a wonder they ever come back to us!

These days I'll sometimes turn and call or whistle in the opposite direction from my dog so the original sound – and any echoes – are both coming from the vector I want him to take. Other times, lower volume precludes an echo. By default, my dogs have learned that a beep from their collar means the same as "here," so that works also.

Now that I know this, my dogs seem to be much more obedient.

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