While you’re chasing gobblers this spring, your turkey-hunting setup could look like a kitchen-table spread to a nearby coyote.

Think about it. You’ve snuck into your setup site quietly and possibly under the cover of darkness. You’ve staked at least one or more decoys out in front of you. Morning winds are generally calm or nonexistent. And you top off this ruse with seductive calling of a hen waiting for her suitor.

Related: Top 10 Spring Turkey Scouting Tips

What’s not to like for a coyote in the neighborhood?

I’ve taken several coyotes over the years that were clearly stalking my decoy setup. I’ve had turkey hunters I’ve guided who have also pulled off deuces — a turkey and a coyote. It’s very likely  you could also find yourself staring at a stalking coyote, so be prepared. Most landowners who give permission to hunt turkeys will also want you to take coyotes.

Tips to Making a Coyote Kill During a Turkey Hunt

1. Make sure you have the proper shotgun load. You’re gunning for big tom but also coyotes. There’s a pretty substantial difference between the two, so prepare for both. Products like Hornady’s Heavy Magnum Turkey in 12-gauge No. 4 shot 1½ ounce will usually do the job.

2. Split the day up. Morning hunts with coyotes on the brain could turn into afternoon hunts for gobblers. Some states like Missouri have half-day hunting, so it works well to fill daylight hours. Plus, many areas have turkeys that shut down in the afternoons. That makes a sunset setup ideal for coyotes. The main focus is to be ready for either opportunity.

3. Know the rules. If you’re planning on springtime turkey hunting, read all the regulations before hitting the woods. There may be a coyote season that requires additional licensing. Each state is different so a quick pre-check could save you from much more hassle down the road.

Related: 10 Ways to Kill More Coyotes

And if you smash a coyote be sure to tell the landowner you’ve removed one more irritation from his schedule.

Featured image: Roman Sydor