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Over the last few years, more and more states have loosened restrictions on the use of crossbows for hunting.

As the Citizen Tribune reports, that push for more crossbows in the field may be about to change. Wyoming, which currently allows for the use of crossbows during archery season, is reviewing its laws. A report from the Wyoming Game and Fish Department tackles crossbows, smart rifles and trail cameras that provide real-time information on animal movement, as well as magnifying optics and holographic sights on archery equipment.

Although the article touches on the fact that compound shooters must come to full draw while crossbows can remain cocked for the duration of a treestand or ground blind sit, it seems that it was shooting distance that put crossbows back on the radar — specifically, the introduction of a new crossbows that allows users to be accurate at distances considerably longer than those allowed by compound bows. The report recommends limiting crossbows to rifle season, except for disabled hunters.

“When it comes down to the balance between opportunity and fair chase, it becomes a public discussion,” said Brian Nesvik, the department’s chief game warden, is quoted as saying in the Citizen Tribune article.

The public will have an opportunity to weigh in on these potential changes, as proposals to limit the use of certain technologies in the field will be discussed in a series of meetings before the commission votes on them.