It’s the Fourth of July weekend and a time for many of you to take a few days off. Enjoy them and as you do remember that your predator-and varmint-hunting interest are truly an American heritage. Do you need some memory-boosting evidence? Well consider these American-history tidbits.

— As America was in its infancy fur trappers and mountain men were exploring beyond the known frontier. They were exploring the American West and bringing back furs, and stories of a land rich in resources. As these tales became more common, American politicians, including President Jefferson, took notice. From 1804 through 1806 the Lewis and Clark expedition confirmed that

— America should not ignore the land west of the Mississippi River (www.lewisandclarktrail.com/101).Hunting has always been a part of early American history, especially predator hunting. Davy Crockett, legendary for his stand at the Alamo, was also an avid bear hunter and even used dogs to tree bears in the early days of this country. (www.historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5816/).

— Not to be ignored was legendary frontiersman Daniel Boone. Like his counterpart Davy Crocket, Boone was also a great hunter and woodsman (www.history.com/topics/daniel-boone). Boone was respected for his opening of the Kentucky frontier, but his coonskin hat wardrobe was a misrepresentation of history. Actually Boone preferred a beaver cap, but nevertheless he enjoyed the benefit of fur as headgear.

— Today the American spirit of hunting predator remains as strong as the fur boom in the early 1800s. More predator-tailored rifles exist than anyone could imagine. The AR-rifle explosion has been adopted by the predator and varmint crowd. Ammunition manufacturers customize more loads for predator enthusiasts than ever in history and you can find an infinite amount of predator hunting gear.

Predator hunting is an American tradition and one that hopefully will be around for generations to enjoy just like the Fourth of July. Happy Birthday America!