Guide to Spring Cleaning on Your New Hunting Lease

March 4, 2011

Often there will be gates and access roads to build, food plots to plant, management cutting, thinning, releasing and planting to do, a campground to establish and stands and blinds to place. Much of this will require ATVs, tractors, mowers, chainsaws, shovels, axes and other tools.

In most cases, the landowner might be able to provide equipment and expertise that can be of use in maintaining roads, establishing food plots and creating wildlife openings. Some landowners will perform the work for free or for the price of gas and oil, or they will allow knowledgeable club members to use their equipment. It is also possible to buy or rent equipment from local dealers. Club members can contribute to a fund earmarked for equipment purchase or they can rent certain items and be reimbursed later out of club funds. Before entering into a lease, be sure that the necessary equipment will be readily available when spring planting, pruning and thinning time comes. Reserve hard-to-come-by vehicles and planting equipment well before they are needed so important soil preparation and seeding can be conducted at the best time for optimum yield.

Always check with local authorities before conducting any habitat manipulation. Some operations, such as controlled burns, might be restricted by state or local laws and could require permits or the attendance of a trained forester or land manager. Also, consult with the local Soil Conservation Service agent or state wildlife biologist for tips on how to best manage your lease for maximum carrying capacity.

Check out the articles below to help you out this spring.

Creating Funnels Fertilizing Mast Trees Food Plot Weed Control Whitetail Cooperatives