Field Test: New Back-Tension Release Aid Cures Target Panic

April 28, 2014

Target panic is something most every archer will struggle with at some point. In layman’s terms, target panic is the fear of putting the pin on the target and executing a relaxed, surprise release. While this nasty annoyance affects archers in different ways, it is something that will certainly hinder shooting enjoyment on the range and success in the field. Having battled target panic myself over the years, I recently made the decision to start shooting a back-tension release.

Scott Archery’s (www.scottarchery.com) new-for-2014 BackSpin features a rotating index-finger hole that spins 360 degrees. This rotation technology allows the release to rotate to the optimal firing position of the shooter and prevents any hang-up effects. In addition, it’s very smooth and easy to operate.

What I quickly discovered is the BackSpin allowed me the ability to let my pin float on the intended target. It gave me time to breathe, relax, and aim. I ordered my BackSpin with a clicker, which I personally recommend, as the sound of the clicker lets one know the actual release of the arrow isn’t far away. At first the clicker made me jump, but as I learned and began to trust the release, I welcomed the sound of the click and was able to keep pulling through the release and execute a perfect shot. And though my pin, especially in windy conditions will dance around the target, my subconscious mind is always dragging that pin back and forth across the point I want my arrow to impact. If I stay focused and trust my release, my arrow hits its mark. It’s truly amazing.

I’ve also noticed that because my BackSpin forces me to take my time, aim, and breath, I’m able to switch back to my index-finger release and execute much more proficient shots than I ever had before. So if you’re struggling with a bit of target panic, I highly recommend purchasing a quality back-tension release and learning to shoot that release effectively.

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Editor's note: Apologies for the extreme windy conditions.